The Colorful Past of Halloween Treats

Happy Halloween!! It’s that creepiest day of the year, when I get all too competitive about carving pumpkins, and something about Bette Midler’s child-hunting sniffing still sends chills down my spine. But why do we do all this? Why do we dedicate an entire day year after year to all things scary and creepy and gory?
Well, as with so many things in this modern world of ours, the answer lies in historical tradition… (I can picture my friends rolling their eyes at this very minute…But it’s true!! What can I say – everything is related to history!) And just as I was about to begin researching for a post on the historical origins of Halloween and the too-good-to-be-true tradition of trick-or-treating, the awesome people over at AntiquityNOW posted this blog, ‘The Colorful Past of Halloween Treats.’ So check it out, and gain a new perspective on all the weird and wonderful things that happen each year on this last day of October, when we carve faces into vegetables and children are actually encouraged to take candy from strangers. (It’s a weird festival when you think about it, isn’t it…?)
Wishing you all a frightfully fun and safe Halloween!

AntiquityNOW

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Lads, look at yourselves. Why are you, boy, wearing that Skull face? And you, boy, carrying a scythe, and you, lad, made up like a Witch? And you, you, you!” He thrust his bony finger at each mask. “You don’t know, do you? You just put on those faces and old mothball clothes and jump out, but you don’t really know, do you? – Ray Bradbury (The Halloween Tree)

Remember the sweet satisfaction of a pillowcase, paper bag or plastic pumpkin-head swelling with the weight of Halloween candy? Think of the candy bars, lollipops and bubble gum mingling together in the monstrous payload you’ve been waiting all year to collect and consume in one riotous night of excitement. It’s so exciting in fact, that you may never pause to ponder why on earth you do it. What happy trick of fate empowered you to don a disguise and march up…

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